skogsdjur said: Hi Biodivseed, have you been following the debate about a 'TTIP' between the USA and EU? Whereas concerns from Supermiljöbloggen and others, point towards a higher control with seeds/biomaterial. Plainly it may include laws against "uncertified" (read: none corporate) biomaterials. (sorry for badly formulated English.) biodiverseed: Du kan godt skriver på svensk hvis det er nemmere! Jeg kan også skrive lidt på dansk, hvis du kan læse det. Men nu vil jeg svare på engelsk: I send very small packages of seed around the world, and I always make sure I am not shipping invasive species, soil, or fungal hitchhikers. I’m careful and responsible. My packages haven’t been stopped yet, partially because I think they are camouflaged in normal mail. However, what I’m doing is illegal in the EU. The effect these agreements have is allowing corporations to ship invasive and non-diverse seed stock with impunity, and lobby to restrict private individuals from selling or swapping their legally-obtained plant materials. It’s ridiculous: around 50% of the world’s seed supply is controlled by three multinationals, and around 70% of it is controlled by 10. I think this has catastrophic implications for biodiversity and food sovereignty. It’s like we’re begging for genetic bottlenecks in our food supply. Agribusiness giants have a huge lobbying force that attempts to patent and make purchaseable things that were formerly in the commons. It costs between $50 to $300 for a private individual to get a phytosanitary certificate, every time, for every plant. Corporations can get a blanket phytosanitary approval. Being in the immigration system, I am not legally allowed to start a business. I would if I could to make things easier, but there is no making money in being a small-scale, responsible seed supplier: up against agribusiness giants you will always be running a deficit, and jumping through regulatory hoops that are designed to keep competition against these companies at a minimum. These trade agreement exacerbate that, because there are always articles hidden in the fine print that protect corporate interests. If you’re a 20-something immigrant swapping free seeds on the internet (like me) there is no legal recourse or lobby for your interests. I want to give stuff away for free, or next to nothing, but that doesn’t produce wealth for anyone but me and the person I am swapping with, so it has to be regulated out of existence.

skogsdjur said: Hi Biodivseed, have you been following the debate about a 'TTIP' between the USA and EU? Whereas concerns from Supermiljöbloggen and others, point towards a higher control with seeds/biomaterial. Plainly it may include laws against "uncertified" (read: none corporate) biomaterials. (sorry for badly formulated English.)

biodiverseed:

Du kan godt skriver på svensk hvis det er nemmere! Jeg kan også skrive lidt på dansk, hvis du kan læse detMen nu vil jeg svare på engelsk:

I send very small packages of seed around the world, and I always make sure I am not shipping invasive species, soil, or fungal hitchhikers. I’m careful and responsible. My packages haven’t been stopped yet, partially because I think they are camouflaged in normal mail.

However, what I’m doing is illegal in the EU.

The effect these agreements have is allowing corporations to ship invasive and non-diverse seed stock with impunity, and lobby to restrict private individuals from selling or swapping their legally-obtained plant materials. It’s ridiculous: around 50% of the world’s seed supply is controlled by three multinationals, and around 70% of it is controlled by 10. I think this has catastrophic implications for biodiversity and food sovereignty. It’s like we’re begging for genetic bottlenecks in our food supply. Agribusiness giants have a huge lobbying force that attempts to patent and make purchaseable things that were formerly in the commons.

It costs between $50 to $300 for a private individual to get a phytosanitary certificate, every time, for every plant. Corporations can get a blanket phytosanitary approval.

Being in the immigration system, I am not legally allowed to start a business. I would if I could to make things easier, but there is no making money in being a small-scale, responsible seed supplier: up against agribusiness giants you will always be running a deficit, and jumping through regulatory hoops that are designed to keep competition against these companies at a minimum.

These trade agreement exacerbate that, because there are always articles hidden in the fine print that protect corporate interests. If you’re a 20-something immigrant swapping free seeds on the internet (like me) there is no legal recourse or lobby for your interests. I want to give stuff away for free, or next to nothing, but that doesn’t produce wealth for anyone but me and the person I am swapping with, so it has to be regulated out of existence.

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thelandofmaps:

Location near Stockholm of foreign submarine using a known Russian distress frequency (may be shittymapporn) [1015x677]CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

So, the Russians are coming! This is about an hour or 2 away from central Stockholm. Bloody Russians. Not happy if they are not threatening someone.
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tastefullyoffensive:

[piecomic]
50981
larstheyeti:

"the maker"
http://theawkwardyeti.com
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“Nothing is more important than that we should not, like sheep, follow the flock that has gone before us, and thus proceed not whither we ought, but whither the rest are going. Nothing gets us into greater troubles than our subservience to common rumor, and our habit of thinking that those things are best which are most generally perceived as such, of taking many counterfeits for truly good things, and of living not by reason but by imitation of others. This is the cause of those great heaps into which men rush till they are piled one upon another.”
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socimages:

Adolescent brains: Cause or consequence?
By Lisa Wade, PhD
In a comments thread, shorelines linked to a fascinating Scientific American article about adolescence by psychologist Robert Epstein. In it, he points to the invention of the very idea of adolescence and its non-universality. In a sample of 186 pre-industrial societies, for example, only 60% had words for the life stage and most had little or no problems with anti-social teen behavior. This data, however, contrasts strongly with new research suggesting that adolescent brains are quite different from adult brains.
How do we make sense of this?
Epstein suggests that differences in brain structure may be the result of social realities, not their cause. He writes:

I have not been able to find even a single study that establishes a causal relation between the properties of the brain being examined and the problems we see in teens… [Meanwhile, c]onsiderable research shows that a person’s emotions and behavior continuously change brain anatomy and physiology… So if teens are in turmoil, we will necessarily find some corresponding chemical, electrical or anatomical properties in the brain. But did the brain cause the turmoil, or did the turmoil alter the brain? Or did some other factors—such as the way our culture treats its teens—cause both the turmoil and the corresponding brain properties.

By “the way our culture treats its teens,” Epstein is referring to the possibility that we infantilize and criminalize them. He includes a figure illustrating how we’ve increasingly targeted teens with laws (shown above).
Teens are subject to, Epstein explains, “…more than 10 times as many restrictions as are mainstream adults, twice as many restrictions as active-duty U.S. Marines, and even twice as many restrictions as incarcerated felons.”
Believing them to be different from adults, we then segregate them:

Today, with teens trapped in the frivolous world of peer culture, they learn virtually everything they know from one another rather than from the people they are about to become. Isolated from adults and wrongly treated like children, it is no wonder that some teens behave, by adult standards, recklessly or irresponsibly.

Epstein has no more data showing that how we treat teens, and how they learn to behave, changes their brain anatomy and physiology, than he does showing the reverse. But the former certainly has substantial neurological precedent. Meanwhile, the latter is comforting to a society awash in out-of-control adolescence: “What is there to do? It’s only natural.” Right?
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook. 
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I don’t have an iPhone, but I imagine this is how it feels. Also props to the comic writer for asking their characters to “pull the plugs” on the internet. This can’t be a very recent book… I hope.
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christel-thoughts:

Perfect
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siberianpine:

via travelling-under-r
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